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Inside Myanmar: “I saw a genocide in slow motion”

The N.Y. Times’ Nick Kristof sneaked into sealed-off Rohingya villages in Myanmar and filed a column saying the U.S. government needs to “do more to name and shame the perpetrators, and to exert relentless pressure for humanitarian access.”

The big picture: “Some 700,000 Rohingya have fled to Bangladesh in recent months, but the fate of those left behind has been less clear, for Myanmar mostly bans foreigners from Rohingya areas.”

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  • “Sometimes Myanmar uses guns and machetes for ethnic cleansing … But it also kills more subtly and secretly by regularly denying medical care and blocking humanitarian aid to Rohingya.”
  • “Myanmar and its Nobel Peace Prize-winning leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, are trying to make the Rohingya’s lives unlivable, while keeping out witnesses.”
  • “The government fired a warning flare when it arrested two Reuters journalists for reporting on an army massacre of Rohingya; the reporters face up to 14 years in prison for committing superb journalism.”
  • “Entering Myanmar on a tourist visa, I was able to slip undetected into five Rohingya villages. What I found was a slow-motion genocide. The massacres and machete attacks of last August are over for now, but Rohingya remain confined to their villages — and to a huge concentration camp — and are systematically denied most education and medical care.
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